Feeding the Brain is a Critical Investment for
Brain Performance, Development and Health
  • Memory
  • Development and learning
  • Mood
  • Critical Thinking
  • Attention & Focus
Memory

Memory is our brain’s superpower to absorb information, store it, and recall it at a later time - it’s kind of like our own mini search engine. A balanced diet with vegetables, fatty fish, healthy fats, herbs and seeds gives our brain the nutritional boost to keep our memory functioning.

Kids
We start remembering things consistently at the age of 4. We proudly sing for anyone who will (or won’t) listen because we know our ABCs.

Adults
We remember more information, more accurately, and our memory increases with good nutrition and sleep! This comes in handy when our first boss rattles off a to-do list longer than a pharmacy receipt.

Seniors
Our processing slows, but staying physically active helps us keep our memory sharp!

Development and learning

Our brain develops throughout our whole life. Fortunately, more in power than size. Simple neural connections form first, followed by more complex ones. Omega-3s play a big role in this. Experiences early in our life and our genes work together to impact our brain development and act as the foundation for future learning, behavior, and health. 

Kids

From birth to three, we form a million neural connections each second. If our bodies grew like our brains at this stage, we’d weigh about 100 lbs by the age of 3!

Adults 

We start to strengthen more efficient and complex brain functions that help us with adulting. Yay budgets, and insurance!

Seniors

Switching up how we do simple tasks can help keep our minds active! Like hustling our grandkids in 7-card-stud instead of rummy from time to time.

Mood

Our mood is not just how we feel, but how we process and acknowledge our feelings. Protein is key in regulating our feelings and omega-3 fatty acids are emerging as an effective therapy for mood disorders. When we see, smell, taste, hear, or touch something, our brain sends messages using neurotransmitters, to trigger our emotions and help us respond and act appropriately.

Kids 

We experiment with showing our emotions through different actions, faces, and play. We test the limits. All of them. All the time.   

Adults 

We develop better emotional stability and learn to process our feelings productively through the help of friends, a good therapist, and the occasional glass of wine.

Seniors

We react less to negative situations, and are generally better at emotional regulation because we know life’s too short to be angry.

Critical Thinking

Critical thinking is a skill we develop to look at facts or a situation, take in information, understand what’s happening, and then make a decision, form a belief, or take action. It is our brain being flexible, interpretive, and creative all at once. We think best when we are hydrated!

Kids 

We start developing our critical thinking skills when we ask “how” and “why” and “why” and “why” and “why” and “why” and “why”.  

Adults 

We think in creative ways and can use abstract reasoning to find solutions. We use metaphors to describe things -- things that probably don’t need a metaphor.

Seniors

It takes us more time to process information; brain games can help us tune this skill. Think, 9 letter word for a popular newspaper puzzle.

Attention & Focus

Focus is being able to concentrate our interest and action on one specific thing. We do this best when we’ve started the day with a balanced breakfast. Our brain helps us focus by filtering through all the information it takes in, holding onto what is important, while ignoring everything else. This skill is known as efficient selection. 

Kids 

At 2 years old, we have an attention span of 4-6 minutes. Which means we can sit still for half of our favorite book before wanting to read the next one.

Adults 

We have honed our ability to selectively tune out unimportant information. So we’re able to effectively work while we’re listening to our podcast, scrolling through social media and talking to our co-worker, all at the same time.

Seniors

We can be more easily distracted, but aerobic exercise can improve brain function!

Memory

Memory is our brain’s superpower to absorb information, store it, and recall it at a later time - it’s kind of like our own mini search engine. A balanced diet with vegetables, fatty fish, healthy fats, herbs and seeds gives our brain the nutritional boost to keep our memory functioning.

Kids
We start remembering things consistently at the age of 4. We proudly sing for anyone who will (or won’t) listen because we know our ABCs.

Adults
We remember more information, more accurately, and our memory increases with good nutrition and sleep! This comes in handy when our first boss rattles off a to-do list longer than a pharmacy receipt.

Seniors
Our processing slows, but staying physically active helps us keep our memory sharp!

Development and learning

Our brain develops throughout our whole life. Fortunately, more in power than size. Simple neural connections form first, followed by more complex ones. Omega-3s play a big role in this. Experiences early in our life and our genes work together to impact our brain development and act as the foundation for future learning, behavior, and health. 

Kids

From birth to three, we form a million neural connections each second. If our bodies grew like our brains at this stage, we’d weigh about 100 lbs by the age of 3!

Adults 

We start to strengthen more efficient and complex brain functions that help us with adulting. Yay budgets, and insurance!

Seniors

Switching up how we do simple tasks can help keep our minds active! Like hustling our grandkids in 7-card-stud instead of rummy from time to time.

Mood

Our mood is not just how we feel, but how we process and acknowledge our feelings. Protein is key in regulating our feelings and omega-3 fatty acids are emerging as an effective therapy for mood disorders. When we see, smell, taste, hear, or touch something, our brain sends messages using neurotransmitters, to trigger our emotions and help us respond and act appropriately.

Kids 

We experiment with showing our emotions through different actions, faces, and play. We test the limits. All of them. All the time.   

Adults 

We develop better emotional stability and learn to process our feelings productively through the help of friends, a good therapist, and the occasional glass of wine.

Seniors

We react less to negative situations, and are generally better at emotional regulation because we know life’s too short to be angry.

Critical Thinking

Critical thinking is a skill we develop to look at facts or a situation, take in information, understand what’s happening, and then make a decision, form a belief, or take action. It is our brain being flexible, interpretive, and creative all at once. We think best when we are hydrated!

Kids 

We start developing our critical thinking skills when we ask “how” and “why” and “why” and “why” and “why” and “why” and “why”.  

Adults 

We think in creative ways and can use abstract reasoning to find solutions. We use metaphors to describe things -- things that probably don’t need a metaphor.

Seniors

It takes us more time to process information; brain games can help us tune this skill. Think, 9 letter word for a popular newspaper puzzle.

Attention & Focus

Focus is being able to concentrate our interest and action on one specific thing. We do this best when we’ve started the day with a balanced breakfast. Our brain helps us focus by filtering through all the information it takes in, holding onto what is important, while ignoring everything else. This skill is known as efficient selection. 

Kids 

At 2 years old, we have an attention span of 4-6 minutes. Which means we can sit still for half of our favorite book before wanting to read the next one.

Adults 

We have honed our ability to selectively tune out unimportant information. So we’re able to effectively work while we’re listening to our podcast, scrolling through social media and talking to our co-worker, all at the same time.

Seniors

We can be more easily distracted, but aerobic exercise can improve brain function!

The Key Building Blocks for Healthy, Happy Mind

Consuming adequate amounts of these nutrients should be an
important part of your daily routine to fuel your best brain.

Omega-3s | DHA / EPA

Essential building blocks of brain cells that ensures normal development. DHA makes up 15% of a child’s brain.

Found In
Algal Oil
Fish Oil

Choline

A critical component for connecting our brain’s ‘information super high-ways.’

Found In
Sunflowers
Eggs

Omega-3s | ALA

An essential fatty acid that supports the growth & development of a healthy brain.

Found In
Flax Seeds
Chia Seeds

Lutein

An antioxidant found in the brain and eyes that supports a healthy brain and vision.

Found In
Marigold Flowers
Egg Yolks

Every Brainiac® Snack is Packed with
the Nutrients Your Brain Needs
Applesauce Pouches
Brain Bars™
Peanut Butter Spread
Yogurt Smoothies
Yogurt Tubes
Applesauce Pouches
1 Pouch (90g)
  • Applesauce Pouches
    1 Pouch (90g)
  • Brain Bars™
    1 Bar (33g)
  • Peanut Butter Spread
    1 Pouch (32g)
  • Yogurt Smoothies
    1 Bottle (7oz)
  • Yogurt Tubes
    2 Tubes (4oz)
Applesauce Pouches
1 Pouch (90g)
  • Applesauce Pouches
    1 Pouch (90g)
  • Brain Bars™
    1 Bar (33g)
  • Peanut Butter Spread
    1 Pouch (32g)
  • Yogurt Smoothies
    1 Bottle (7oz)
  • Yogurt Tubes
    2 Tubes (4oz)
Applesauce Pouches
1 Pouch (90g)
  • Applesauce Pouches
    1 Pouch (90g)
  • Brain Bars™
    1 Bar (33g)
  • Peanut Butter Spread
    1 Pouch (32g)
  • Yogurt Smoothies
    1 Bottle (7oz)
  • Yogurt Tubes
    2 Tubes (4oz)
Applesauce Pouches
1 Pouch (90g)
  • Applesauce Pouches
    1 Pouch (90g)
  • Brain Bars™
    1 Bar (33g)
  • Peanut Butter Spread
    1 Pouch (32g)
  • Yogurt Smoothies
    1 Bottle (7oz)
  • Yogurt Tubes
    2 Tubes (4oz)
Applesauce Pouches
1 Pouch (90g)
  • Applesauce Pouches
    1 Pouch (90g)
  • Brain Bars™
    1 Bar (33g)
  • Peanut Butter Spread
    1 Pouch (32g)
  • Yogurt Smoothies
    1 Bottle (7oz)
  • Yogurt Tubes
    2 Tubes (4oz)
1 Pouch (90g)
1 Bar (33g)
1 Pouch (32g)
1 Bottle (7oz)
2 Tubes (4oz)
Omega-3s
160mg
100mg
155mg
510mg
145mg
DHA/EPA
130mg
--
75mg
230mg
65mg
ALA
30mg
100mg
80mg
280mg
80mg
Choline
120mg
55mg
55mg
210mg
60mg
Lutein
--
3mg
--
--
--
Additional Ingredients in Brainiac® and Their Benefits

Chicory Root

Chicory Root

Prebiotics for 
Gut Health

Organic Oats

Organic Oats

Source of energy and
helps lower cholesterol 

Organic Puffed Quinoa

Organic Puffed Quinoa

Source of
iron and fiber

Pea Syrup

Pea Syrup

Low glycemic
source of sweetness

Organic Black Chia Seeds

Organic Black Chia Seeds

Helps improve
digestive health

Agave Fiber

Agave Fiber

Prebiotic and
blood stabilizer 

Pea Crisps

Pea Crisps

Source of
Vitamins C, E and Zinc

Dark Chocolate

Dark Chocolate

Powerful source of
antioxidants

Cinnamon

Cinnamon

Blood sugar
regulation

US Grown Apples

US Grown Apples

Immune and digestive
system support

Brainiac® is backed by a team of neurologists, pediatricians, dietitians and nutrition scientists

Our diverse Science and Nutrition Advisory Board is essential in helping us
develop the BrainPack® and each of our products.

Jill Castle, MS, RD, LDN
Nutrition Expert, Author of 10 Books
John Columbo, PhD
Director, Life Span Institute, Univ. of Kansas
Dr. Rachel Bensen MD
Instructor, Gastroenterology, Stanford Univ.
Prof. Susan Carlson, PhD
Dietetics & Nutrition, Univ. of Kansas
Prof. Steven Zeisel, MD, PhD
Dir. Nutrition Research Institute, Pediatrician, UNC
Prof. Elliott Sherr, MD
Neurology, UCSF
Prof. Eric Decker, PhD
Head of Food Science, Univ. of Mass.
Laura Jana, MD
Author, Adj. Prof. Penn State
Brain nutrition sets the foundation of intelligence for our kids' future.
Jill Castle, MS, RD, LDN
Nutrition Expert, Author of 10 Books
John Columbo, PhD
Director, Life Span Institute, Univ. of Kansas
Dr. Rachel Bensen MD
Instructor, Gastroenterology, Stanford Univ.
Prof. Susan Carlson, PhD
Dietetics & Nutrition, Univ. of Kansas
Prof. Steven Zeisel, MD, PhD
Dir. Nutrition Research Institute, Pediatrician, UNC
Prof. Elliott Sherr, MD
Neurology, UCSF
Prof. Eric Decker, PhD
Head of Food Science, Univ. of Mass.
Laura Jana, MD
Author, Adj. Prof. Penn State
Brain Fueling Best Sellers from Brainiac®

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